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Commercial Real Estate

Paramount Partners with TCN Worldwide Real Estate Services


Paramount Real Estate Corp Partners with
TCN Worldwide Real Estate Services
Paramount is proud to continue our partnership with TCN Worldwide Real Estate Services for the 12th year.  TCN Worldwide is an alliance of top independent brokerage firms serving more than 200 markets. Work with a global leader while accessing the unique knowledge that only local offices can provide.
TCN Worldwide, a consortium of independent commercial real estate firms, provides complete integrated real estate solutions locally and internationally.  An extensive range of real estate services coupled with a personal commitment to exceed expectations is what allows TCN Worldwide to be a leader in this competitive industry.  Comprised of leading independent brokerage firms, serving more than 200 markets globally.  TCN Worldwide combines an entrepreneurial approach with years of local experience.  Around the globe, across all property types and service groups, TCN Worldwide’s more than 1,500 brokers and salespeople have a well-earned reputation for providing straightforward expert advice.
Let TCN Worldwide Work For You… TCN Worldwide affiliates are able to meet their clients’ real estate needs globally by utilizing local expertise while retaining direct control and responsibility, providing a single point of contact.  We offer comprehensive commercial real estate transaction, management and consulting services, all provided with the highest level of corporate accountability and entrepreneurial commitment.
TCN Worldwide allows you to communicate directly with a business owner and entrepreneur.  We offer more than sound real estate advice.  We offer a partner to share your vision.  When you work with TCN Worldwide you’ll be working with someone who shares your sense of ownership and accountability.

Ranked among Most Powerful Brokerage Firms – Commercial Property Executive
A Best of The Best: Brokerage Firm – National Real Estate Investor
One of the Industry’s Most Recognizable Brands – The Lipsey Co., Top 25 CRE Brands Survey

EXPECTATIONS WHEN HIRING A REAL ESTATE BROKER

Expectations When Hiring A Real Estate Broker Photo

EXPECTATIONS YOU SHOULD HAVE WHEN
HIRING A REAL ESTATE BROKER
When a firm engages the services of a licensed real estate broker, what should be the expectation in terms of service and performance? There are many areas to note, but I will mention three that I believe are most important.

Experience.
Enthusiasm and hard work can make up for many deficiencies. There is no question that those two qualities are critical to any successful real estate assignment. However, people just beginning their careers in the brokerage business don’t start by tackling the most difficult deals. Standard practice in the industry is for a young person to be partnered with, and mentored by, a more seasoned veteran. There is much at stake in any real estate deal. Understanding how to structure the proper deal, familiarity with existing market conditions, editing lease language, and negotiating with area landlords generally is earned by riding the coat tails of a more experienced broker and on-the-job experience. Most of what I have learned over the years has come through time spent with experienced and competent landlords, attorneys and contractors . . . and making plenty of mistakes!!!

Honesty.
Absolutely essential! When any firm, large or small, places its trust in an individual broker, particularly with what’s at stake in a real estate deal, the broker must present an “open book” of himself and the deals he presents to the client. If a landlord is offering a special broker trip or bonus for concluding a deal, the client needs to know. If the broker represents a building they are recommending to the client, the client needs to know. A perceived conflict is sometimes worse than an actual conflict. In every instance, without exception, the broker must do what is best for the client.  There should be total transparency from start to finish.

Value.
The broker must provide value in every step of the process. If there is no value, what benefit is there to the client? Value comes in many forms and weighted differently by various firms. However, successful firms are focused firms, and taking the time required to complete a real estate deal can easily eat up lots of time . . . and money!!! Expecting a full-time employee with no experience or knowledge to represent the firm’s best interests in the marketplace is foolish. Landlords know their business, and you know yours; and someone needs to be an advocate for the client.

Looking For A Great Real Estate Broker? Look No Further!!!
Industrial Brokers:
Fred Hedberg, CCIM, SIOR, Principal
Phil Simonet, Principal
John Young, CCIM, Vice President
Joseph Schultz, Associate
Jack Buttenhoff, Associate

Office Brokers:
Nancy Powell, Vice President
 
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THE ECONOMIC OUTLOOK FOR CRE INVESTMENTS

THE ECONOMIC OUTLOOK FOR CRE INVESTMENTS WITH DR. MARK DOTZOUR

DESCRIPTION:
We are proud to present this special TCN Worldwide webinar featuring Dr. Mark Dotzour.  He is a frequent participant at TCN conferences and one of the truly ‘entertaining economists’ to provide an economic outlook and forecast for TCN members as well as their clients, prospects, friends, and family.
Join TCN Worldwide and Dr. Mark Dotzour as he discusses:

The outlook for job growth in the US.
Will the recovery be quick or prolonged?
What is the outlook for inflation in 2021 and beyond?
The outlook for borrowing rates
What is the outlook for cap rates?
What is the outlook for investor demand for US commercial real estate?

SPECIAL GUEST SPEAKER:

Dr. Mark G. Dotzour (CRE Economist)
Former Chief Economist and Director of Research at Texas A & M University
Dr. Mark G. Dotzour is a real estate economist who served for 18 years as Chief Economist of the Real Estate Center at Texas A&M University in College Station.  He has given more than 1,450 presentations to more than 250,000 people.  He has written over 90 articles for magazines and journals.
Dr. Dotzour makes complex economic issues easily understandable.  Above all, Mark’s goal is to provide his audience with a “tool kit” of useful information that will help them make good business decisions.  Ultimately, helping their families, their clients, and their company.
His research findings have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Money Magazine and Business Week.  Similarly, his clients include banks, private equity firms, real estate investment trusts, construction firms, engineering companies, wealth managers, private foundations, and commercial and residential brokerage firms.  In addition, he has made presentations to local and national trade associations all over America.
Special thanks to TCN Worldwide for hosting this webinar.
Questions? Call Paramount Real Estate Corporation.

FOCUS ON WHAT’S IMPORTANT

Focus on what's important post photo

FOCUS ON WHAT’S IMPORTANT
Companies searching for new office or industrial space in today’s soft office market, or conversely today’s healthy industrial market and listing brokers and landlords are guilty of this as well… They often tend to focus almost exclusively on rental rate.  In other words, the lowest price should be enough to positively influence a tenant’s decision to lease space in a building.  The result? We’re “commoditizing” commercial space alternatives while losing the focus on what is right and best for the tenant.
SPACE ISSUES BEYOND PRICE
Let me be the first to say that economics are always important and competing buildings must be reasonably similar.  However, economics are not the most important element when it comes to making a real estate decision.  I have often told clients, “What difference does it make if the landlord provides the space at no cost, if the space is not functional and does not effectively work for you?”  Retail clients generally seem to have a better handle on weighing the intangibles when they make space decisions.  They understand that there are issues far more important than price.  Issues such as exposure, vehicle traffic counts, ease of access, parking and neighboring tenants.  Issues that will impact their long‐term success more than a marginal reduction in their base rental rate.
TOTAL COST SOLUTION
So many components go into a good real estate decision, and price is only one of those components.  Tenants need to look at a “total cost solution” rather than just a “rental rate” solution.  The latter is the proverbial tail wagging the dog kind of decision, and decisions like that never work well over the long term.  That’s why establishing a preliminary budget is critical to the process.  So that companies don’t waste time looking at what they can’t afford.  Companies often do themselves a disservice by discounting the importance that a well thought out facilities plan plays in their long‐term success.  Space, like any other component of a firm’s business plan, should function strategically.  Ultimately, ensuring long‐term success for the firm.  The list of items that ensure long‐term success generally relegates price to the lower tier of importance.
RANKING CRITICAL ISSUES
Companies must address, evaluate and rank the importance of critical issues.  These may include parking availability, access, visibility, building efficiency, flexibility to expand and contract, on‐site or close‐by amenities, public transportation availability, security, sustainability issues, building management, landlord financial viability ‐‐‐ and, obviously, the financial structure.  Whether internally generated or broker generated, tenants must understand the total cost of the deal.  One deal may provide more dollars for tenant improvements; another deal may offer less tenant improvement dollars but more free rent.  Yet another may offer to graduate or step the rent and pay moving costs.  And in the end, a simple consideration like ease of client access or proximity to public transportation may trump the lower base rent deal.
Guard against making an impulsive, “head in the sand” facility evaluation.  Select a member of your team and a competent real estate broker who will ensure that your firm makes a well thought out space decision, not a decision based on a single issue like rental rate.  Make sure you have completed the proper due diligence before signing on the bottom line!
NEED HELP FINDING THE RIGHT SPACE?
Reach out to one of our
TRUSTED. DEDICATED. EXPERIENCED.
brokers at Paramount Real Estate Corporation: 
Industrial: Fred Hedberg, CCIM, SIOR, Principal
Phil Simonet, Principal
John Young, CCIM, Vice President
Joseph Schultz, Associate
Jack Buttenhoff, Associate
Office: Nancy Powell, Vice President

RELATIONSHIPS BUILT TO LAST

Relationships Built to Last

RELATIONSHIPS BUILT TO LAST

Paramount recently represented the Owner of 1000 West 94th Street in Bloomington.  The building is approximately 5,000 square feet, with about one-third of an acre of fenced and paved outdoor storage. The client has worked with the Paramount Team for 20+ years.  The relationship began with one transaction in the late 1980s, and has grown substantially since that first transaction.  A mutual trust was developed during the first lease negotiation through open communication, honesty, and truly working in the client’s best interests.  Over the last 20+ years, many more transactions have reinforced the trust that is the foundation of the relationship.
Too often commercial real estate services are commoditized.  Excellent customer service is a lost art that few providers genuinely offer.  Business owners generally have multiple projects underway at once.  The ability to retain a trusted advisor to handle all real estate related tasks can free up an immense amount of time for busy decision makers.  This allows them to focus on running the business.  That is not to say that the business owner is uninvolved, on the contrary; constant communication between the client and the advisor is the most efficient way to build trust and create a successful conclusion to a project.
Paramount prides itself on its customer service.  The team of Paramount professionals  have built a brand with a reputation that Paramount has the knowledge, integrity, expertise, and communication skills to not only satisfy their clients, but go beyond to deliver extraordinary results.  Paramount works hard for our clients, large and small, and seeks to obtain relationships built to last.
Written by: Joseph Schultz, East Team Associate

SUBLEASING IN TODAY’S MARKETPLACE

Subleasing in Today's Marketplace

SUBLEASING IN TODAY’S MARKETPLACE
Subleasing in today’s market is commonplace.  There are a variety of reasons why firms sublease their excess space.  However, for those who intend to sublease, some caution is appropriate.

Make sure to check on the credit and payment history of the firm subleasing the space, particularly if they will pay any part of the gross rent due and payable to the Prime Landlord.
Carefully read and understand the tenant obligations under the Prime Lease.  This is often an attached exhibit to the sublease document.  The Subtenant’s obligation is to comply with the terms of the Prime Lease.
Make sure to receive the Prime Landlord’s formal approval, in writing.  Sometimes this is as simple as a signed consent note on the signature page of the sublease document.  On the other hand, the consent form can be several pages.  If the Prime Landlord’s consent in the Prime Lease is something other than “reasonable,” make sure to understand what the “other” stipulations are.
If modifications are made to the space, understand the obligations in respect to the lease.  Removing modifications may be a requirement upon termination of the sublease.
Make sure the life safety and exiting requirements meet local codes.  Often times, a space carved from a larger space does not meet the proper exiting requirements, which may mean extra costs.https://paramountre.com/agent/phil-simonet/

For more information on subleasing space, reach out to our experts:
Phil Simonet, Principal | John Young, CCIM, Vice President | Nancy Powell, Vice President | Jeffrey Swanson, Associate | Joseph Schultz, Associate | Jack Buttenhoff, Associate

TWIN CITIES MARKET SNAPSHOT

TWIN CITIES MARKET SNAPSHOT
The Minneapolis-St. Paul Real Commercial Estate Market continues to perform admirably with office and industrial sectors demonstrating excellent performance throughout 2019.  The Markets characteristics remain upbeat and include positive net absorption of vacant space, moderate to low vacancy rates and measured new speculative development.  Economic conditions remain favorable however, recent statics raise concern for the continued overall economic growth in Minnesota and the USA.  While inflation continues to remain low at about 2% (annualized), unemployment has increased from 2.5% to 2.9%.  Median income for Minnesota households as stagnated year over year at $70,300.  Both still much better numbers than the national averages of 3.4% unemployment and median household income of $63,179 respectively.  The 15 month trade war with China combined with all of the uncertainty in Washington DC (impeachment and gridlock) and slowing business investment-down 1% on an annualized rate last quarter create potential headwinds to sustained future economic growth.

Industrial Market



 
Industrial has been the best performing asset class of real estate since the Great Recession in 2009.  Vacancy rates are at an all-time low (4.9%) in a Twin City universe of 248 million square feet and have decreases by 1% since the beginning of 2019.

Net Absorption of available space stands at 2.73 million square feet through the third quarter of this year.  With bulk (high-bay) warehouse experiencing 1.74 million square feet of net absorption.  Driving the net absorption has been e-commerce related companies localizing the distribution of almost everything now available on the internet.
To date there are 27 industrial projects under construction totaling 3.6 million square feet.  1.9 million square feet has already been delivered to the market.

Collectively, what all this most likely indicates is a continuation, at least through 2020, of relatively good conditions and performance for the industrial market.  The two current deterring factors, other than an economic slowdown, are the cost of tenant improvements and finding and hiring employees.

Office Market

The office market continues its long standing recovery albeit some sub markets are stronger than others.  The overall office vacancy rate for all Twin Cities office properties is 11.8%, which is down .8% from January 2019, however within multi-tenant properties the vacancy rate is 15.4%.  The northeast office market has the lowest vacancy rate at 8.6% and St. Paul CBD has the highest vacancy rate approaching 20%.  Class A multi-tenant office space has the lowest vacancy rate at 12.5%. Class B Office space is at 17.7% and Class C is 13.8%.
Net absorption Year to Date is 363,871 square feet.  Actual absorption Year to Date is 504,247 square feet, however sublease space create 128,052 square feet of negative absorption.

The office market performance has instilled enough confidence in a local developer to spec a 361,104 square foot office building in the West End mixed use development named 10 West End.  Net rental rates are projected to start at $25.50/sf.

One new office market characteristic that has been gaining momentum is the demand for building amenities.  Many office buildings have completed or are planning to complete updates to building common areas, add amenities such as work out areas, coffee bars, common area meeting spaces, food service, and concierge services among other things.  Many of today’s sophisticated tenants want space that is fun and functional.  They want space that will retain and attract top talent in the current tight labor market.

Questions Tenants often Ask Regarding Their Occupancy

Questions Tenants often Ask

Q & A
Questions Tenants often Ask Regarding Their Occupancy
Written by Bob Johnston | Vice President Sales & Leasing

QUESTION #1:  What if the Landlord isn’t finished building out my space by the time I want to move in?
ANSWER:  If the Landlord is actually responsible for the completed work, much depends on how the lease is written and the commencement date defined.  For example, a commencement date can tie to the substantial completion of the space, so the lease will not commence until the Landlord completes the work.  Sometimes, the date is even contingent upon occupancy and the commencement of business in the space.  On the other hand, the lease might define a specific commencement date.  If the Landlord is late, the lease language will generally state that there is no culpability on the Landlord’s part, but the commencement date becomes the date on which the space is completed and the initial term extended from that date.  In short, these issues are negotiable and dependent on each tenant’s situation.

QUESTION #2:  Toward the end of each calendar year, the Landlord sends us a note informing us of the new Common Area Maintenance (CAM) & Real Estate Tax estimate for the following year.  However, we never get a breakdown of the actual expenses.  Is that available?
ANSWER:  Most landlords will provide that information if requested.  It always helps to have language in the lease that allows for a tenant’s review of the costs; and with larger tenants, audit rights are always helpful.

QUESTION #3:  What do I need to do to get the tenant improvement allowance provided by the Landlord?
ANSWER:  Typically, smaller tenants with smaller budgets, the only requirement is a formal letter requesting Landlord reimbursement of the allowance and proof of completion accompanied by all subcontractor lien waivers.  Larger jobs can have a title company involved to administer “construction draws” and monitor the construction progress.

QUESTION #4:  Do I need to hire a disinterested third party architect to confirm the size of my space?
ANSWER:  Typically not, but each situation is different.  The buildings architect can pre-measure individual spaces or bays.  From the measurements, floor plans can be drawn.  Therefore, the space computation is generally accurate.  RU factors can vary by building, and are often much higher in smaller buildings.  It helps to check the accuracy of the actual useable space and clarify the respective RU factor to calculate the rentable area (the number that determines the annual rent).

Get answers to all your commercial real estate questions & questions tenants often ask.

TRUSTED.  DEDICATED.  EXPERIENCED.

Call (952) 854-8290

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Successful Commercial Leasing = Understanding Your Rent

Successful Commercial Leasing=Understanding Your Rent

Successful Commercial Leasing = Understanding Your Rent
by Bob Johnston | Vice President Sales & Leasing

THE TERMINOLOGY OF RENT

Successful commercial leasing is all about understanding your rent.  Most commercial leasing today are “net leases.”  Meaning that the tenant pays a “base rent” which is “net rent”, or separate from, the operating costs and real estate taxes for the property.  The operating costs are then passed on to the tenant as a separate cost.  Equaling a total rent cost and what many then refer to as “gross rent.”
Even this varies, however, from property to property. For example, often times in retail and industrial properties, tenants pay for their use of electricity and gas as well as janitorial services.  In addition, sometimes the tenant, at its expense, must contract for local trash pick-up.  These separately contracted costs are not part of the ordinary operating expenses.  On the other hand, office leases typically are “full service” leases.  In other words, there are generally no extra charges.  Other than perhaps charges for extraordinary use of services such as air conditioning or cleaning, etc.
It is critical that a tenant understand the complete picture and know what the total rent will be. Also, it is critical that the tenant understand what expenses make up operating costs.  Then understand what costs are reasonable and legitimate.  It is obviously to the landlord’s advantage to get the tenant to pay as much of the total operating budget as possible.  This is even more critical in mixed-use projects.  Mixed use is where landlords tend to shift maintenance costs for the residences to the office component.  Thus, the office tenant contribution is actually more than what it should be.  I once audited the landlord of a very large mixed-use project in Chicago.  I found over $100,000 wrongfully allocated to the tenant even though the lease prohibited their doing so.

WHAT SHOULD NOT BE INCLUDED IN RENT?
Here are some suggestions as to what to eliminate from the landlord’s menu.  The list is obviously not exhaustive, but rather illustrative of some of the costs landlords attempt to pass on to tenants:

Leasing commissions, space planning expenses with architects/interior designers, or even attorney costs associated with a lease negotiation or existing tenant dispute.
Costs associated with the construction of tenant improvements, either with new tenant relocations or existing tenant renovations and remodeling.
Costs associated with the entity of landlord, particularly as it relates to partnership/ownership issues or the selling or refinancing the property.
Many large landlords have affiliates or interests in affiliate companies, so it is important to ensure that the contracted vendor costs are no more than what an unrelated third party vendor might charge.
Be careful about the expenses for salaries, benefits, etc. that go into “management fees.”  Executive salaries, or any allocation of those salaries, should not be part of the operating costs for the building.
Capital improvements are not, by accounting standards, expense items.  Although, landlords can routinely pass on the amortized cost of the improvement as an operating expense.
Make certain that in a retail environment, the tenant’s pro-rata share of operating expenses is calculated over the entire leasable area of the property.  Rather than only on the space currently leased and occupied.

Proper due diligence and understanding of the components of a building’s operating budget are critical to a tenant’s successful occupancy, financial stability and long-term enjoyment of the space.

For the best in commercial real estate
service and solutions.

Call (952) 854-8290

BE SOCIAL!

Ownership Cycle of a Commercial Property

OWNERSHIP CYCLE OF A COMMERCIAL PROPERTY
WEST BLOOMINGTON BUSINESS CENTER: 6300 W Old Shakopee Rd, Bloomington, MN

The ownership cycle of commercial properties can be quite unique.  In 1997, Fred Hedberg, Principal of Paramount Real Estate Corporation was asked by a past client to determine the value and marketability of some excess land that was remaining after building a mini-storage facility on a site in Bloomington, Minnesota.  Fred provided a valuation and marketing plan for the land.  He also suggested that his client might want to consider developing an office-showroom or industrial building on the site.  The market for that type of product was very strong at that time. Fred suggested to his client that if this was of interest, he would like to co-develop and own the building with his client.
Forming a Partnership
The prospect of continuing to own the land and not pay capital gains tax on a sale was appealing to Fred’s client.  It was beneficial having the opportunity to partner with a seasoned real estate professional.  Who also had a good understanding of the market and kind of buildings and spaces tenants were looking for at that time.  They agreed to move forward on a new development together.  They began to work with an architect and contractor.  Whom laid out a building on the site that would meet current market demands for space.  As well as a building that would meet the test of time.
Developing the Property
After reviewing financial projections prepared by Fred, a partnership formed to move forward with the project.  Construction drawings, city approvals and financing were completed and secured.  The general contractor selected for the new 80,714 SF project was Kraus Anderson.  The project called West Bloomington Business Center.
Completing the Project
The partners hired Paramount Real Estate Corporation to lease and manage the building.  In 1998, the shell building was completed and by the end of 1999 was fully leased and built out.  The building attracted well-known local and national tenants that leased the majority of the building as office space.  In 1999 the building was recognized by NAIOP as a recipient of their Awards of Excellence for the Light Industrial-High Finish category.  The building has performed well though the various real estate cycles that followed.  It has stood the test of time as different tenants with uses other than office have found it to be a desirable building and location for their businesses.
Selling the Building
After 20 years of ownership, Fred and his partner decided that it would be in their best interests to sell the building during the current business cycle for estate planning purposes and to maximize their return on the investment.  Fred found a local investor that was in need of a 1031 exchange property. West Bloomington Business Center fulfilled his exchange requirement and his desire to own a well performing, high quality asset.  The property sold in August 2018.  The new owner hired Paramount Real Estate Corporation to continue to lease and manage the building.
Paramount Continues to Lease and Manage Property
Fred and his leasing and property management team are excited to have the opportunity to continue to work on this project in the future.   See detailed information about the space currently available at West Bloomington Business Center.
Written by: Fred Hedberg

If you would like real estate investment advice,
please contact:
www.paramountre.com
(952) 854-8290