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Leasing

Questions Tenants often Ask Regarding Their Occupancy

Questions Tenants often Ask

Q & A
Questions Tenants often Ask Regarding Their Occupancy
Written by Bob Johnston | Vice President Sales & Leasing

QUESTION #1:  What if the Landlord isn’t finished building out my space by the time I want to move in?
ANSWER:  If the Landlord is actually responsible for the completed work, much depends on how the lease is written and the commencement date defined.  For example, a commencement date can tie to the substantial completion of the space, so the lease will not commence until the Landlord completes the work.  Sometimes, the date is even contingent upon occupancy and the commencement of business in the space.  On the other hand, the lease might define a specific commencement date.  If the Landlord is late, the lease language will generally state that there is no culpability on the Landlord’s part, but the commencement date becomes the date on which the space is completed and the initial term extended from that date.  In short, these issues are negotiable and dependent on each tenant’s situation.

QUESTION #2:  Toward the end of each calendar year, the Landlord sends us a note informing us of the new Common Area Maintenance (CAM) & Real Estate Tax estimate for the following year.  However, we never get a breakdown of the actual expenses.  Is that available?
ANSWER:  Most landlords will provide that information if requested.  It always helps to have language in the lease that allows for a tenant’s review of the costs; and with larger tenants, audit rights are always helpful.

QUESTION #3:  What do I need to do to get the tenant improvement allowance provided by the Landlord?
ANSWER:  Typically, smaller tenants with smaller budgets, the only requirement is a formal letter requesting Landlord reimbursement of the allowance and proof of completion accompanied by all subcontractor lien waivers.  Larger jobs can have a title company involved to administer “construction draws” and monitor the construction progress.

QUESTION #4:  Do I need to hire a disinterested third party architect to confirm the size of my space?
ANSWER:  Typically not, but each situation is different.  The buildings architect can pre-measure individual spaces or bays.  From the measurements, floor plans can be drawn.  Therefore, the space computation is generally accurate.  RU factors can vary by building, and are often much higher in smaller buildings.  It helps to check the accuracy of the actual useable space and clarify the respective RU factor to calculate the rentable area (the number that determines the annual rent).

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Successful Commercial Leasing = Understanding Your Rent

Successful Commercial Leasing=Understanding Your Rent

Successful Commercial Leasing = Understanding Your Rent
by Bob Johnston | Vice President Sales & Leasing

THE TERMINOLOGY OF RENT

Successful commercial leasing is all about understanding your rent.  Most commercial leasing today are “net leases.”  Meaning that the tenant pays a “base rent” which is “net rent”, or separate from, the operating costs and real estate taxes for the property.  The operating costs are then passed on to the tenant as a separate cost.  Equaling a total rent cost and what many then refer to as “gross rent.”
Even this varies, however, from property to property. For example, often times in retail and industrial properties, tenants pay for their use of electricity and gas as well as janitorial services.  In addition, sometimes the tenant, at its expense, must contract for local trash pick-up.  These separately contracted costs are not part of the ordinary operating expenses.  On the other hand, office leases typically are “full service” leases.  In other words, there are generally no extra charges.  Other than perhaps charges for extraordinary use of services such as air conditioning or cleaning, etc.
It is critical that a tenant understand the complete picture and know what the total rent will be. Also, it is critical that the tenant understand what expenses make up operating costs.  Then understand what costs are reasonable and legitimate.  It is obviously to the landlord’s advantage to get the tenant to pay as much of the total operating budget as possible.  This is even more critical in mixed-use projects.  Mixed use is where landlords tend to shift maintenance costs for the residences to the office component.  Thus, the office tenant contribution is actually more than what it should be.  I once audited the landlord of a very large mixed-use project in Chicago.  I found over $100,000 wrongfully allocated to the tenant even though the lease prohibited their doing so.

WHAT SHOULD NOT BE INCLUDED IN RENT?
Here are some suggestions as to what to eliminate from the landlord’s menu.  The list is obviously not exhaustive, but rather illustrative of some of the costs landlords attempt to pass on to tenants:

Leasing commissions, space planning expenses with architects/interior designers, or even attorney costs associated with a lease negotiation or existing tenant dispute.
Costs associated with the construction of tenant improvements, either with new tenant relocations or existing tenant renovations and remodeling.
Costs associated with the entity of landlord, particularly as it relates to partnership/ownership issues or the selling or refinancing the property.
Many large landlords have affiliates or interests in affiliate companies, so it is important to ensure that the contracted vendor costs are no more than what an unrelated third party vendor might charge.
Be careful about the expenses for salaries, benefits, etc. that go into “management fees.”  Executive salaries, or any allocation of those salaries, should not be part of the operating costs for the building.
Capital improvements are not, by accounting standards, expense items.  Although, landlords can routinely pass on the amortized cost of the improvement as an operating expense.
Make certain that in a retail environment, the tenant’s pro-rata share of operating expenses is calculated over the entire leasable area of the property.  Rather than only on the space currently leased and occupied.

Proper due diligence and understanding of the components of a building’s operating budget are critical to a tenant’s successful occupancy, financial stability and long-term enjoyment of the space.

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Powell Represents OffiCenters in Lease Renewal at North Loop

OffiCenters in Lease Renewal

Press Release | Powell Represents OffiCenters in Lease Renewal at North Loop
MINNEAPOLIS, MN.  Nancy Powell, Vice President at Paramount recently assisted our long-term client, OffiCenters in a lease renewal at their North Loop location in Minneapolis.  Lori, the founder and CEO of the locally held co-working and executive office sharing solutions corporation, is not daunted by the influx of co-working competitors, in fact she says “bring it on!”  For 35 years they have brought office sharing solutions to Minneapolis and St. Paul.
With 5 locations, OffiCenters offers nearly 100,000 square feet of office space solutions.  They focus on the needs of their customer, OffiCenters is not afraid to relocate to find the right space solution.  In fact in the past few years, Nancy has assisted them in relocating three of their centers.
NEW LOCATION: Union Plaza OffiCenter: 333 Washington Avenue N, Suite 300, Minneapolis MN

Ownership Cycle of a Commercial Property

OWNERSHIP CYCLE OF A COMMERCIAL PROPERTY
WEST BLOOMINGTON BUSINESS CENTER: 6300 W Old Shakopee Rd, Bloomington, MN

The ownership cycle of commercial properties can be quite unique.  In 1997, Fred Hedberg, Principal of Paramount Real Estate Corporation was asked by a past client to determine the value and marketability of some excess land that was remaining after building a mini-storage facility on a site in Bloomington, Minnesota.  Fred provided a valuation and marketing plan for the land.  He also suggested that his client might want to consider developing an office-showroom or industrial building on the site.  The market for that type of product was very strong at that time. Fred suggested to his client that if this was of interest, he would like to co-develop and own the building with his client.
Forming a Partnership
The prospect of continuing to own the land and not pay capital gains tax on a sale was appealing to Fred’s client.  It was beneficial having the opportunity to partner with a seasoned real estate professional.  Who also had a good understanding of the market and kind of buildings and spaces tenants were looking for at that time.  They agreed to move forward on a new development together.  They began to work with an architect and contractor.  Whom laid out a building on the site that would meet current market demands for space.  As well as a building that would meet the test of time.
Developing the Property
After reviewing financial projections prepared by Fred, a partnership formed to move forward with the project.  Construction drawings, city approvals and financing were completed and secured.  The general contractor selected for the new 80,714 SF project was Kraus Anderson.  The project called West Bloomington Business Center.
Completing the Project
The partners hired Paramount Real Estate Corporation to lease and manage the building.  In 1998, the shell building was completed and by the end of 1999 was fully leased and built out.  The building attracted well-known local and national tenants that leased the majority of the building as office space.  In 1999 the building was recognized by NAIOP as a recipient of their Awards of Excellence for the Light Industrial-High Finish category.  The building has performed well though the various real estate cycles that followed.  It has stood the test of time as different tenants with uses other than office have found it to be a desirable building and location for their businesses.
Selling the Building
After 20 years of ownership, Fred and his partner decided that it would be in their best interests to sell the building during the current business cycle for estate planning purposes and to maximize their return on the investment.  Fred found a local investor that was in need of a 1031 exchange property. West Bloomington Business Center fulfilled his exchange requirement and his desire to own a well performing, high quality asset.  The property sold in August 2018.  The new owner hired Paramount Real Estate Corporation to continue to lease and manage the building.
Paramount Continues to Lease and Manage Property
Fred and his leasing and property management team are excited to have the opportunity to continue to work on this project in the future.   See detailed information about the space currently available at West Bloomington Business Center.
Written by: Fred Hedberg

If you would like real estate investment advice,
please contact:
www.paramountre.com
(952) 854-8290