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EXPECTATIONS WHEN HIRING A REAL ESTATE BROKER

Expectations When Hiring A Real Estate Broker Photo

EXPECTATIONS YOU SHOULD HAVE WHEN
HIRING A REAL ESTATE BROKER
When a firm engages the services of a licensed real estate broker, what should be the expectation in terms of service and performance? There are many areas to note, but I will mention three that I believe are most important.

Experience.
Enthusiasm and hard work can make up for many deficiencies. There is no question that those two qualities are critical to any successful real estate assignment. However, people just beginning their careers in the brokerage business don’t start by tackling the most difficult deals. Standard practice in the industry is for a young person to be partnered with, and mentored by, a more seasoned veteran. There is much at stake in any real estate deal. Understanding how to structure the proper deal, familiarity with existing market conditions, editing lease language, and negotiating with area landlords generally is earned by riding the coat tails of a more experienced broker and on-the-job experience. Most of what I have learned over the years has come through time spent with experienced and competent landlords, attorneys and contractors . . . and making plenty of mistakes!!!

Honesty.
Absolutely essential! When any firm, large or small, places its trust in an individual broker, particularly with what’s at stake in a real estate deal, the broker must present an “open book” of himself and the deals he presents to the client. If a landlord is offering a special broker trip or bonus for concluding a deal, the client needs to know. If the broker represents a building they are recommending to the client, the client needs to know. A perceived conflict is sometimes worse than an actual conflict. In every instance, without exception, the broker must do what is best for the client.  There should be total transparency from start to finish.

Value.
The broker must provide value in every step of the process. If there is no value, what benefit is there to the client? Value comes in many forms and weighted differently by various firms. However, successful firms are focused firms, and taking the time required to complete a real estate deal can easily eat up lots of time . . . and money!!! Expecting a full-time employee with no experience or knowledge to represent the firm’s best interests in the marketplace is foolish. Landlords know their business, and you know yours; and someone needs to be an advocate for the client.

Looking For A Great Real Estate Broker? Look No Further!!!
Industrial Brokers:
Fred Hedberg, CCIM, SIOR, Principal
Phil Simonet, Principal
John Young, CCIM, Vice President
Joseph Schultz, Associate
Jack Buttenhoff, Associate

Office Brokers:
Nancy Powell, Vice President
 
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SUBLEASING IN TODAY’S MARKETPLACE

Subleasing in Today's Marketplace

SUBLEASING IN TODAY’S MARKETPLACE
Subleasing in today’s market is commonplace.  There are a variety of reasons why firms sublease their excess space.  However, for those who intend to sublease, some caution is appropriate.

Make sure to check on the credit and payment history of the firm subleasing the space, particularly if they will pay any part of the gross rent due and payable to the Prime Landlord.
Carefully read and understand the tenant obligations under the Prime Lease.  This is often an attached exhibit to the sublease document.  The Subtenant’s obligation is to comply with the terms of the Prime Lease.
Make sure to receive the Prime Landlord’s formal approval, in writing.  Sometimes this is as simple as a signed consent note on the signature page of the sublease document.  On the other hand, the consent form can be several pages.  If the Prime Landlord’s consent in the Prime Lease is something other than “reasonable,” make sure to understand what the “other” stipulations are.
If modifications are made to the space, understand the obligations in respect to the lease.  Removing modifications may be a requirement upon termination of the sublease.
Make sure the life safety and exiting requirements meet local codes.  Often times, a space carved from a larger space does not meet the proper exiting requirements, which may mean extra costs.https://paramountre.com/agent/phil-simonet/

For more information on subleasing space, reach out to our experts:
Phil Simonet, Principal | John Young, CCIM, Vice President | Nancy Powell, Vice President | Jeffrey Swanson, Associate | Joseph Schultz, Associate | Jack Buttenhoff, Associate