All Posts in Tag

Retail

FORMER KABUKI RESTAURANT SITE SOLD IN EDEN PRAIRIE

FORMER KABUKI RESTAURANT SITE SOLD IN EDEN PRAIRIE
Site Location: 6534 Flying Cloud Drive | Eden Prairie, MN
Paramount Real Estate Corp listed the former Kabuki Restaurant site for sale in the fall of 2018.  The 2.5 acre site provides easy access to Crosstown 62 and Hwy 169.  It is located between Shady Oak Road, on the West, and Valley View Road, on the South.
Finding the Right Fit…
Due to its location, interest was high and the site tours were frequent.  Interested users proposed many different uses.  These included a dog daycare, pickle-ball courts, various types of restaurants and retail, a daycare, a brewery, storage facilities and office space.  Many also wanted to use the site for outdoor storage, but current zoning does not allow this.  In addition, the City was changing the zoning from Highway Commercial to Industrial Tech Flex.  That alone prohibited many of the uses proposed.  The Seller actually agreed to two separate purchase agreements. The agreements were then subsequently voided because the city discouraged both users’ proposed plans.
Challenges to Overcome…
The sales process was an interesting one.  The building was in poor condition with the HVAC, roof, electrical, plumbing and restrooms needing updating.  The seller held an online auction to clear out much of the remaining kitchen equipment and assorted restaurant accessories.  Unfortunately what followed the auction was a bit devastating; vandalism and unsold stolen equipment.  As if that wasn’t enough, the former Kabuki site had household junk dumped and abandoned on four different occasions.
A Closed Transaction…
In December 2019, we finalized yet another purchase agreement for the former Kabuki Restaurant site.  The Coronavirus did have an effect as well, delaying the normal due diligence process and typical closing.  The result… business closings and financial issues.  Amending and extending the purchase agreement three times also didn’t speed anything up.  The sale did ultimately close in June 2020.
It was a long sales process!  Thankfully the Sellers as well as their legal counsel, were patient and willing to work toward a final agreement.  We commend them for their willingness to work through the many problems and issues that occurred throughout the process.  That being said, all parties are relieved that the property finally closed.
Written By: Bob Johnston | Vice President

Successful Commercial Leasing = Understanding Your Rent

Successful Commercial Leasing=Understanding Your Rent

Successful Commercial Leasing = Understanding Your Rent
by Bob Johnston | Vice President Sales & Leasing

THE TERMINOLOGY OF RENT

Successful commercial leasing is all about understanding your rent.  Most commercial leasing today are “net leases.”  Meaning that the tenant pays a “base rent” which is “net rent”, or separate from, the operating costs and real estate taxes for the property.  The operating costs are then passed on to the tenant as a separate cost.  Equaling a total rent cost and what many then refer to as “gross rent.”
Even this varies, however, from property to property. For example, often times in retail and industrial properties, tenants pay for their use of electricity and gas as well as janitorial services.  In addition, sometimes the tenant, at its expense, must contract for local trash pick-up.  These separately contracted costs are not part of the ordinary operating expenses.  On the other hand, office leases typically are “full service” leases.  In other words, there are generally no extra charges.  Other than perhaps charges for extraordinary use of services such as air conditioning or cleaning, etc.
It is critical that a tenant understand the complete picture and know what the total rent will be. Also, it is critical that the tenant understand what expenses make up operating costs.  Then understand what costs are reasonable and legitimate.  It is obviously to the landlord’s advantage to get the tenant to pay as much of the total operating budget as possible.  This is even more critical in mixed-use projects.  Mixed use is where landlords tend to shift maintenance costs for the residences to the office component.  Thus, the office tenant contribution is actually more than what it should be.  I once audited the landlord of a very large mixed-use project in Chicago.  I found over $100,000 wrongfully allocated to the tenant even though the lease prohibited their doing so.

WHAT SHOULD NOT BE INCLUDED IN RENT?
Here are some suggestions as to what to eliminate from the landlord’s menu.  The list is obviously not exhaustive, but rather illustrative of some of the costs landlords attempt to pass on to tenants:

Leasing commissions, space planning expenses with architects/interior designers, or even attorney costs associated with a lease negotiation or existing tenant dispute.
Costs associated with the construction of tenant improvements, either with new tenant relocations or existing tenant renovations and remodeling.
Costs associated with the entity of landlord, particularly as it relates to partnership/ownership issues or the selling or refinancing the property.
Many large landlords have affiliates or interests in affiliate companies, so it is important to ensure that the contracted vendor costs are no more than what an unrelated third party vendor might charge.
Be careful about the expenses for salaries, benefits, etc. that go into “management fees.”  Executive salaries, or any allocation of those salaries, should not be part of the operating costs for the building.
Capital improvements are not, by accounting standards, expense items.  Although, landlords can routinely pass on the amortized cost of the improvement as an operating expense.
Make certain that in a retail environment, the tenant’s pro-rata share of operating expenses is calculated over the entire leasable area of the property.  Rather than only on the space currently leased and occupied.

Proper due diligence and understanding of the components of a building’s operating budget are critical to a tenant’s successful occupancy, financial stability and long-term enjoyment of the space.

For the best in commercial real estate
service and solutions.

Call (952) 854-8290

BE SOCIAL!

Q4-2018 Retail Market Trends – Minneapolis-St. Paul

Q4 2018 RETAIL MARKET TRENDS | Mpls-St. Paul
Economic Overview
According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the unemployment rate for the Mpls-St. Paul metropolitan statistical area (MSA) decreased 50 basis points from 2.5% in November 2017 to 2.0% in November 2018. The unemployment rate for the U.S. was at 3.8% in October 2018, up from 2.8% for the State of Minnesota.  The Mpls-St. Paul MSA saw an increase in retail job growth, leisure and hospitality growing by 3,600 during the same period.
Market Overview
The Mpls-St.Paul retail market, consisting of over 89 msf of space in seven counties across the metro posting an availability rate of 6.6% for Q4 2018.  The vacancy rate for the market stands at 5.9% to close out 2018.  The average asking lease rate for Mpls-St. Paul came in at $18.01 psf NNN. To date, there are over 34 construction projects throughout the market, totaling just over 768,000 sf.
Market Highlights
At the close of Q4 2018, the market experienced over 344,000 sf of leasing activity and the vacancy rate finished the year at 5.9% in total and the Southwest market posting the lowest rate at 4.5%. The top five lease transactions accounted for over 135,000 sf throughout Mpls-St. Paul with the largest leased space for Hobby Lobby leasing 61,000 sf.
READ ENTIRE REPORT: Q4 2018 – Retail Market Trends
Written By: MNCAR/Redi Comps